New Canadian Media

A delegation from New Haven led by the Chairperson of the New Haven and Freetown Sister Cities Madam Althea Norcott (seen in photo with President Koroma) has donated $140,000 worth in vehicles (4 in total), water, medical supplies and a few school supplies as a gesture of their empathy towards the people of Sierra Leone in the fight against the Ebola virus disease (EVD).
The donation will arrive in Freetown on 21st April, 2015 and will be presented to President Ernest Bai Koroma by (...)

- Salone News /

The Patriotic Vangaurd

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Published in Africa

Springtime has arrived in the United States and other western nations around the world. But we all feel its nature and impact differently. For those living in the northeastern and northwestern hemispheres of USA, some chilly temperatures still strive and the passion for physical outdoor activities could be negligible. Food has to be grown to feed an increasing population. Green House technology could be adopted to grow veggies all year round by creating the conditions necessary that are (...)

The Patriotic Vangaurd

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Published in Health

By Jasminee Sahoye A recent study suggests that a simple way to lower the risk of dying from a heart attack is to eat nuts. Researchers at Vanderbilt University and…

The Caribbean Camera

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Published in Health
Friday, 13 March 2015 08:21

NCM NewsFeed: Weekly Newsletter Mar. 13

Our headlines this week: New Canadians' votes matter + doing business with China + the "healthy immigrant effect" + Bill C-51+ new rules for migrant workers + exploring Italian roots + the niqab debate


 

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Here and Now

This week we introduce two new columns: People@Work and Election Watch. People@Work is intended to help new Canadians integrate into the workforce. Election Watch will explore the importance of the new Canadian vote in this year’s federal election.

We also have the final instalment of our three-part investigative series on racism in Winnipeg by our NCM 360° reporting team. And this week we give you a feel for the pulse of Western Europe, an insight on doing business with China, and an introduction to the “healthy immigrant effect.”

People@Work deals with ‘small talk’ in job interview settings: Fo Niemi, executive director of the Centre for Research-Action on Race Relations, Tana Turner, principal of Turner Consulting Group, and Hamlin Grange, president of DiversiPro, join forces to help you navigate "iceberg" questions loaded with cultural references that are specific to certain ethnic backgrounds and social groups.

Election Watch goes beyond the ‘ethnic vote’ to explain a growing political reality in this country: new Canadians’ votes matter. No federal party can afford to disregard new Canadians, as they are informed, engaged, and inclined to vote, write Inder S. Marwah and Stephen E. White, both SSHRC postdoctoral fellows, along with Phil Triadafilopoulos, an associate professor of political science at the University of Toronto Scarborough and the School of Public Policy and Governance.

Getting past the divide in Winnipeg: Cherise Sucharan looks at how Winnipeg — and the rest of Canada — can combat deeply rooted racism. Her NCM 360° article points out that the recent Maclean’s feature, which labelled Winnipeg as Canada’s most racist city, let other cities off the hook and that the conversation needs to expand to cities like Montreal, Vancouver and Toronto.

How Chinese and western business cultures meet in Canada is explored by Robin Brown, senior vice-president of consumer insights at Environics Research Group, and Kathy Cheng, the company’s vice-president of cultural market research. The authors explain how Canadians’ success is becoming more dependent on the need to understand China’s business culture.

Why vaccines are crucial for new Canadians is answered by Dr. Ubaka Ogbogu of the University of Alberta, who says although new immigrants are generally healthier than settled immigrants and Canadian-born persons — a phenomenon termed the “healthy immigrant effect” — this advantage is lost when it comes to certain infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis and HIV, which are often endemic to the immigrants’ countries of origin. Immigrants’ mortality rates from infectious diseases are also higher than among the Canadian-born population.

Feeling the pulse of Western Europe is Humberta Araújo. While France has dominated the news cycle in 2015, with the Charlie Hebdo shooting receiving wide coverage, here’s a look at what else has been going on in that part of the world and its diaspora, as reported by a variety of ethnic-media outlets.

Williamson tweets apology for ‘offensive and inappropriate language’ on TFWP: Kelsey Johnson of iPolitics broke news last weekend of the Conservative MP telling delegates at the Manning Conference in Ottawa that it makes no sense to pay “whities” to stay home while companies “bring in brown people” as temporary foreign workers. The former PMO director of communications later tweeted that he “used offensive and inappropriate language regarding the Temporary Foreign Workers Program. For this I apologize unreservedly.”

Ripples

A Canadian Tamil family’s alleged detention at Sri Lanka’s main international airport has prompted a Tamil parliamentarian in that country to advise the diaspora not to return. “There is no gain in returning. To my knowledge, a family came to Sri Lanka about ten days back. A father, mother and a child came from Canada. This family was arrested at the airport and detained for more than four hours. The authorities obtained a statement from the family and finally released them,” said Suresh Premachandran of the Tamil National Alliance.

Meanwhile, the Canadian Tamil Congress (CTC) has expressed concern about the proposed anti-terrorism legislation. “As Canadians, we are concerned about the civil rights implications in Bill C-51, in particular the impact on racialized community groups,” said David Poopalapillai, National Spokesperson for the Canadian Tamil Congress in a press release. “In the past, Tamil Canadians have faced increased scrutiny and negative stereotyping after being falsely tainted with the ‘terrorist’ label.”

A new study by Simon Fraser University (SFU) researcher, Eve Sajoo (pictured), says Vancouver’s third-generation Italians are more interested in maintaining their original cultural identity than their parents and grandparents. SFU’s Institute for Diaspora Research and Engagement partnered with Vancouver’s Italian Cultural Centre on the study to look at possible causes for newfound interest in Italian-language classes. They also wanted to know what’s behind the growth in Italian cultural centres in Seattle, Montreal and Toronto. An interesting finding from the study is that for many respondents, Canada is defined by its ethno-cultural variety — to be Canadian is to be part of a mosaic

Another study, this time in the area of health, has found that the younger a person is when they immigrate to Canada, the higher their risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and its major subtypes, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. While their parents were at lower risk of developing IBD, once they arrive the children of immigrants from the Middle East, North Africa and South Asia had the same incidence of IBD as the children of non-immigrants, according to a study by researchers at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences and the University of Ottawa. Canada has one of the world’s highest rates of IBD.

Improving trade and economic cooperation between Canada and Macedonia was the focal point of a two-day event dubbed ‘Canadian Days’ last week in Skopje. Organized by Macedonia 2025, the aim was to raise engagement between the two countries. Canada has a Macedonian diaspora of over 250,000 people.

This is no joke and its ripple effect will be felt across the country in the coming months. As of April 1, 2015, migrant workers in low-wage occupations who have worked in Canada for four years will not be able to renew their work permits and will have to wait another four years before being able to return and  work in the country. As this “four and four” rule applies to temporary foreign workers under various streams, the Migrant Workers Alliance has put out a factsheet for those likely to be impacted.

Harmony Jazz

Following Liberal Leader Trudeau’s Toronto speech accusing the federal government of sowing fear and prejudice against Muslims, and the political jousting that followed, Conservative Senator Marjory Lebreton admits that the Tories are getting a "bad rap with Muslims.” In one of the more thoughtful and stronger commentaries on the issue, Michael den Tandt looks at the substance and strategy behind Trudeau’s remarks.

The government’s messaging is mixed. At the Manning Conference, Minister for Multiculturalism Jason Kenney used Obama-like rhetoric, noting Canadian Muslims’ help in the fight against extremism. And Treasury Board President Tony Clement said in an interview that Muslim women in the public service are perfectly free to wear the niqab. But then Minister Kenney tweeted an image of women dressed in burqas and chained at the wrists, assuming it to depict ISIS oppression but actually from a Shia Ashura ceremonial procession — akin to Christian re-enactments of the Crucifixion.

Lastly, two articles from France — how young Muslims often straddle two worlds and a French rabbi’s efforts to engage Muslims in the suburbs of Paris — and an interesting look at the shadowy world of birth tourism at ‘maternity hotels’ in the United States.

Back Pocket

Here’s a story of an Indian who spent a lot of time watching films as boy before realizing his dream in Canada and making one of his own. As his debut feature film Blood Empires debuts at various film festivals before its release in cinemas, Peter Rajesh Joachim is back in his hometown of Bengaluru recounting his journey and prepping for his next film. “This year I’m planning two films — one is a joint collaboration between India and Canada, and we are looking for visionary producers who will invest one crore [ten million Indian rupees] in it. I’m still knocking on doors. The second is a Tamil-Kannada combination script I’m working on for a feature film. I’m a Tamilian and I watch a lot of Tamil cinema. But I think in English and write in English,” says Joachim, explaining his bearings.

And finally, here's a Vancouver-raised model who went abroad for success, signing a deal with the Canadian Tourism Commission to front its campaign in Asia. Standing at an impressive 6-foot-4, Godfrey Gao (pictured) worked as a “living mannequin” in British Columbia. But as he wanted more, he left for Taiwan to further his career. His gamble paid off and in 2011 he was hired by Louis Vuitton to become its first Asian model.



With that, have a great weekend and don’t forget to look up the next edition of NCM NewsFeed every Friday!

Publisher’s Note: This NewsFeed was compiled with input from our Newsroom Editors and regular columnist, Andrew Griffith. We welcome your feedback.

 

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Published in Top Stories

Filipinos who move to Canada are more prone to having breast cancer at a younger age than women from other parts of East Asia or Caucasians, according to a recent study.

They are also more likely to be diagnosed with a more aggressive form of cancer and are more likely to undergo a mastectomy, according to the paper titled “Breast Cancer Amongst Filipino Migrants: A Review of the Literature and Ten-Year Institutional Analysis.”

Asian Pacific Post

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Published in Health

People’s wishes for end-of-life care are more likely to be honoured if they make clear plans for their deaths and share them, according to a panel of experts who recently addressed legal, medical and ethical questions associated with the final stages of life. 

The Canadian Jewish News

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Published in Health
Saturday, 21 February 2015 00:01

Swine Flu Kills 703 In India

New Delhi: India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi Thursday has asked health officials to ensure necessary treatment and adequate medicines for swine flu patients while affected states have been offered central assistance even as the death toll due to the disease reached 703.

A high-level meeting, chaired by Cabinet Secretary Ajit Seth, was convened here to review the situation and address issues like shortage of drugs.

The Weekly Voice

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Published in International

WASHINGTON: Mindfulness meditation practices may help improve sleep quality in older adults with moderate sleep disturbance, a U.S. study said Monday. An estimated 50 percent of individuals 55 years and older have some sort of sleep problem in the United States, and moderate sleep disturbances in older adults are associated with higher levels of […]

The Weekly Voice

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Published in Health
Saturday, 07 February 2015 00:01

Ontario launches updated plan for health care

Ontario is introducing the next phase of transformation to the province’s health care. The new plan – Patients First: Ontario’s Action Plan for Health Care – outlines how the province will increase access to better and more coordinated care, and ensure the health care system is sustainable for generations to come.
This action plan focuses on four goals:

Salam Toronto

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Published in Health

People who snore may think that their partners or roommates are the ones most affected by their nightly symphonies — after all, they’re the ones who are kept awake while the noisemaker remains, for the most part, blissfully unaware.

But snoring can be more than just an annoyance to anyone else in the room; it can be a symptom of a serious health condition, and has been linked to dangers like heart disease.

The Weekly Voice

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Published in Health

Poll Question

Do you agree with the new immigration levels for 2017?

Yes - 30.8%
No - 46.2%
Don't know - 23.1%
The voting for this poll has ended on: %05 %b %2016 - %21:%Dec

Featured Quote

The honest truth is there is still reluctance around immigration policy... When we want to talk about immigration and we say we want to bring more immigrants in because it's good for the economy, we still get pushback.

-- Canada's economic development minister Navdeep Bains at a Public Policy Forum economic summit

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