New Canadian Media

By Belen Febres-Cordero in Vancouver

Upon arrival, immigrant populations in Canada tend to present less allergies than their Canadian-born counterparts, but prevalence increases with time, a national study finds. However, exposing them to ethnic foods and cultural practices that they were accustomed to may help reduce allergies in this population, according to the researchers. 

There is no definitive answer as to the cause(s) of the definitely noted increase in allergies in immigrant populations when they move to Western countries such as Canada. However, the pattern is real and needs to be analyzed”, says Dr. David Fischer, President of the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (CSACI).

As first-generation immigrants to Canada, Dr. Hind Sbihi (picture below), Research Associate at the University of British Columbia, and Jiayun Angela Yao, PhD candidate at the same institution, became intrigued by allergy rates among newcomers and conducted a study to understand the role that genetics and environmental factors play in the development of non-food allergies, such as hay fever.

“Our best hope to curb the increasing trend in allergic disorders is to prevent it.”

The researchers explain that in the past decade, the media, public and researchers have mainly focused on food allergies “It’s critical to raise awareness for non-food allergies given their high prevalence in our population, and posing a big burden to our health care system,” they add.

Canada has some of the highest allergy rates

This is particularly true because Canada has some of the highest allergy rates in the world. According to the American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology, approximately 10-30% of the global population has hay fever. While in the United States roughly 7.8% of people 18 and over has this allergy, almost 20% of the population in Canada is affected by it. Considering these statistics, Sbihi and Yao wanted to understand if immigrants in the country would also display an increase in allergies.

“Our study highlighted the unique opportunity to investigate allergies in migrant populations, who are going through a natural experiment, in which the environment around them changes dramatically in a relatively short period of time,” they explain.   

To conduct the study, the scholars used the data collected in the Canadian Community Health Survey, which gathered information about the health status, lifestyle habits and basic demographics of a large and representative sample of Canadians. In the survey, respondents were asked whether they had non-food allergies – diagnosed by a physician-, and whether they were immigrants to Canada and if so, their time since arrival. “We took the responses to these questions, and assessed the statistical association between non-food allergies and immigration status”, they say.Photo Credit:Hind Sbihi Linkedin

Following this method, the study found that only 14.3% immigrants who had lived in Canada for less than 10 years had non-food allergies, while the rates for immigrants over 10 years and non-immigrants were 23.9% and 29.6%, respectively.

These results suggest that environmental factors, such as pollution, levels of sanitization and dietary choices, carry more weight in the development of allergic conditions in Canada, Dr. Fischer explains, while Dr. Sbihi and Yao add that more research is needed to pinpoint what those factors are, and to better understand how allergies arise by country of origin.

They also highlight the need for undertaking multicultural strategies to improve newcomers’ health.

Ethnic foods may help

Dr. Sbihi and Yao add that it is also important to understand that allergies are symptoms of a loss of internal balance that results from a dysfunction of the immune system. “Providing immigrants with means to access food or cultural practice that are ethnically-friendly may help them transition smoothly into the new environment without perturbing their natural balance,” they suggest.  

“Our best hope to curb the increasing trend in allergic disorders is to prevent it. Prevention can only happen when there is a good understanding of risk factors that come to play in the development of these disorders.” For these reasons, they suggest that raising awareness among health practitioners about the link between immigration, environment and allergies might help in their patients’ management.

“The main role for medical practitioners is to work with patients to recognize if they have allergies, to manage them acutely with their patients and if necessary refer them allergist if there is some doubt about the diagnosis or for more definitive management,” says Dr. Fischer.

Published in Health

 NEW UBC research finds that many online resources for preventing Alzheimer’s disease are problematic and could be steering people in the wrong direction.

In a survey of online articles about preventing Alzheimer’s disease, UBC researchers found many websites offered poor advice and one in five promoted products for sale—a clear conflict of interest. “The quality of […]

 

Indo-Canadian Voice

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Published in Health
Tuesday, 13 September 2016 02:01

Yoga Embraces Historic and Cultural Divides

 As diet and exercise become increasingly prominent in Canadians’ lives, many Vancouverites have turned to yoga to supplement their fitness regimen. It is now the second most popular leisure activity in the country.

More than just a physical activity, yoga is also one of the most diverse spiritual traditions in the world, influencing numerous faiths…

The Source

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Published in Health
Friday, 09 September 2016 13:01

Beat High Blood Pressure with Yoga

By Dr. George I. Traitses If you are looking to lower your blood pressure, yoga might be the answer. A new study has found that yoga has countless benefits for people who have high blood pressure. The study was presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hypertension recently. By simply practicing yoga, 

The Philippine Reporter

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WE all have bad days, even bad weeks. Life takes its toll on all of us causing occasional sleepless nights, changes in appetite and mood. But what if they persist and those symptoms are in fact the early signs of something more serious?

Often we dismiss the early symptoms of depression and anxiety disorders as […]

Indo-Canadian Voice

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Published in Health
Saturday, 20 August 2016 09:00

Punjabis World’s Unhealthiest People?

 By Dr. Sawraj Singh

I have had the opportunity to visit many countries and regions of the world.  I lived in America for more than forty years. America is like a miniature version of the world. There are communities from every country and region living in America. Therefore, I had opportunities to interact with almost all different communities. Every year, we hosted Diversity Day. Hundreds of people belonging to different communities came to our farmhouse. From this extensive interaction with diverse communities, I got the impression that Punjabis are one of the unhealthiest people in the world.-- Delivered by Feed43 service

The Link

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Published in India
Thursday, 04 August 2016 03:28

The Body is like an Onion

 

In my experience, the body is like an onion, with layer upon layer of past history beneath the visible surface. What does this mean?


Let’s start at the beginning, with a pregnant mom. Like many pregnant women, this mom has lower back pain. Unbeknownst to her, the baby’s head got stuck in an odd position in the pelvis.  Labour is long and painful, and the doctor eventually resorts to using forceps to pull the baby out. The baby seems okay and everyone breathes a sigh of relief. 

 

Epoch Times

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Published in Health
Wednesday, 06 July 2016 18:29

Canadian Pharma: Know Your Patient

Commentary by Rohit Phillips in Aurora, Ontario

The fast-growing multicultural consumer segment of Canada represents a potential opportunity for pharmaceutical companies, especially if they can improve patient outcomes on a national scale.

For a small or mid-tier drug company battling to make headway in the general market, capturing a large portion of the multicultural market may be the path to improved profitability and growth. 

Ethnic (or “Diversity”) Healthcare is all about the ‘culturally sensitive connection’ to effectively address ‘health and healthcare disparities’ that result from cultural differences. These differences influence the health and well-being of Canada’s growing visible ethnic minority population, which made up to 20 per cent of the total population in 2013 and is projected to grow to 32 per cent by 2031.  

Fifteen years from now, it’s projected that visible minorities will make up 63 per cent of Toronto, 59 per cent of Vancouver, 31 per cent of Montreal.  Together, these three areas will account for 70 per cent of Canadian GDP.

Genetic, Environmental and Cultural Factors 

The factors contributing to varied drug responses are complex and inter-related. Differences in drug response among racial and ethnic groups are determined by genetic, environmental, and cultural factors. These factors may operate independently of one another, or they may work together to influence outcomes.

Biological Factors: The genetic makeup of an individual may change the action of a drug in a number of ways as it moves through the body. Clinically, there may be an increase or decrease in the intensity and duration of the expected typical effect of the drug.

Environmental Factors: Diet, climate, smoking, alcohol, drugs, pollutants —may cause wide variations in drug response within an individual and even wider variations between groups of individuals.

Cultural Factors: Cultural or psycho-social factors, such as the attitudes and beliefs of an ethnic group, may affect the effectiveness of, or adherence to, a particular drug therapy.

Being Culturally Sensitive

Multicultural marketing isn’t just attaching a face to your campaign.

It has more to do with presenting information in a culturally relevant way and context. Isn’t all communication and marketing about better connecting with the audience?

So, what aspects of any ethnicity do marketers and advertisers need to understand to connect their brand messages well?

Here are a few important ones:  

1.       Language: It’s not just about translation from English. The message must be written for and from the perspective of the minority language audience. Health promotion communication should also take into account the visual and oral cultural cues, like pictures and music.

2.       Beliefs: Beliefs can be powerful forces that affect our health and capacity to heal. Whether personal or cultural, they influence us in one of two ways – they modify our behaviour or they stimulate physiological changes in our endocrine or immune systems. Many cultural beliefs have implications for healthcare, which may be direct or indirect.

As an example, many Asians believe that the number four is unlucky because when pronounced in Japanese or Chinese it sounds very similar to the word for “death”. Thus, items arranged in groups of four, such as pills or syringes, can symbolize bad luck for those people who believe in numerology.

3.       Behaviours: Culture has a bearing on the way a person acts in response to a particular situation. Buddhist teachings emphasize ‘’face’’ or dignity. An individual’s wrongdoing causes the immediate family to lose face. Such behaviours have a direct bearing on disease screening and diagnoses as patients may not admit or realize they have health problems, especially mental health problems, as this may bring shame upon their family.

4.       Communication style: Refers to ways of expressing oneself to others and can be very different for a Chinese-Canadian compared to an Indo-Canadian. Older Chinese patients tend to be polite and may smile and nod. Nodding does not necessarily indicate agreement or even understanding of medical facts. Understanding of verbal and non-verbal communication styles of these cultures is critically important during screening, diagnoses and outreach programs.

5.       Notions of modesty: Modesty is highly valued in South Asian culture. An example is an elderly woman who may be soft-spoken and not advocate for herself. Important decisions are made in this culture only after consulting with family members or close family friends. Involving the family and friends in intervention/prevention programs and long-term care for specific ailments like diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancers can go a long way in increasing compliance, raising awareness and generating brand loyalty.

Despite the many differences among the cultures that make up our nation, we all have the same basic needs: to be able to convey the symptoms and concerns of an illness, to receive competent care, to be acknowledged and valued.

A few fundamentals

When conducting situation analysis and a SWOT analysis of your business plan, the following are important for success:

·         Explore implications of demographic changes (regional and national)

·         Segment patient population by ethnicity

·         Identify differences in disease incidence (determine if your product treats a condition in which a health disparity exists between the ethnic and general populations. For example, is mortality different among ethnic groups in your disease category?)

·         Examine the growth patterns of your customer base

·         Find out from physicians and managed care organizations what issues they encounter in an increasingly diverse population. Then identify challenges and opportunities your company can pursue

·         Find out what your competition is doing to serve the needs of the “emerging majority”

Rohit is a seasoned healthcare marketing and advertising professional with an entrepreneurial instinct and a degree in pharmacy. Rohit is currently employed with The Gibson Group, a healthcare communication agency in Canada.

Published in Health

 LIVING in a democratic country may add 11 years to your life expectancy, according to new research from the University of British Columbia’s department of sociology. The study found that people living in countries that hold free and fair elections live 11 years longer, on average, and see a reduction in infant mortality by almost […]

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Indo-Canadian Voice

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Published in Health

WOMEN expecting a baby can access a new Pregnancy Passport to help them have a healthy pregnancy, track their progress, and prepare for their baby.

Our Special Journey: Pregnancy Passport is a booklet developed by Perinatal Services BC in partnership with the Ministry of Health and health authorities and is a companion to Baby’s Best Chance: Parents’ Handbook of Pregnancy and Baby Care.

The Pregnancy Passport includes:

* information for women to think about and discuss with their care provider relating to their needs throughout their pregnancy, birth, and after their baby is born;

Indo-Canadian Voice

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Published in Health
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Poll Question

Do you agree with the new immigration levels for 2017?

Yes - 30.8%
No - 46.2%
Don't know - 23.1%
The voting for this poll has ended on: %05 %b %2016 - %21:%Dec

Featured Quote

The honest truth is there is still reluctance around immigration policy... When we want to talk about immigration and we say we want to bring more immigrants in because it's good for the economy, we still get pushback.

-- Canada's economic development minister Navdeep Bains at a Public Policy Forum economic summit

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