New Canadian Media
Wednesday, 29 March 2017 09:59

“We All Have Xenophobia to Some Degree”

by Ashoke Dasgupta in Winnipeg

The Islamic Social Services Association recently organized a conference on the theme of “At the Heart of Human Rights is Human Dignity” in Winnipeg.

It was attended by about 180 people, including many important speakers, but there was no local media coverage in the mainstream.

Andrew J. McLean, medical director of the North Dakota Department of Human Services and Chair of the Psychiatry Department at the N. Dakota School of Medicine, spoke on “Community Resilience and the Concept of the ‘Other.’”

He pointed out some unhealthy aspects of “otherization”: they are of less value; they are different from “me” and “us;” their differences are to be belittled; they are seen as “abject.”

“To work with another, you have to be able to admire something about them, even if you don’t like them,” said McLean.

The Rev. Dr. Loraine MacKenzie Shepherd, a United Church Minister, spoke on “Beyond Our Comfort Zone: the LGBTQ Community, Hopes, Challenges, Collaborations and the Right to Dignity,” pointing out that hate groups lump “undesirables” together: “A part of the brain lights up when we see another, but not if we ‘otherize’ them.”

Everyone has prejudices

“We all have xenophobia to some degree,” said Shepherd. “But we must learn to be in solidarity with one another. Openness and courage are necessary to build relations and trust across communities that usually distrust one another.”

The event featured several “Conversation Cafes". One pointed out that prejudice may be positive or negative. Love is a positive prejudice which blinds us to the beloved’s negative qualities. Hate is the opposite.

The world is too complex for individuals to analyze each individual or phenomenon individually, and we don’t usually have the time. Consequently we fall back on our past experiences to make quick decisions.

For example, one may glance at the colour of the sky before leaving home and decide to carry one’s umbrella because that sort of sky often signals rain in our experience. One may then carry an umbrella all day, yet it may not rain; but if we ignore our past experiences, we deprive them of meaning.

We may have had negative (or positive) experiences justifying our pre-judgements, but should not fail to revise them when confronted with evidence to the contrary, concluded the participant.

Indifference and Silence are Threats

The Emcee, retired CBC Radio Host Terry MacLeod, welcomed Danny Smyth, Chief of the Winnipeg Police Service, and Scott Kolody, RCMP Assistant Commissioner, on the second day. In his address, Smyth said, “Women in our community will be a big part of the solutions.”

MacLeod called Shahina Siddiqui, Executive Director of the Islamic Social Services Association, “the godmother of everything that happened here,” and Kolody called her a leader.

Their greetings were followed by a heartfelt video message from Marie-Claude Landry, Chief Commissioner, Canadian Human Rights Commission. “Indifference and silence are threats,” she said.

A participant asked MacLeod why there were so few media people of colour in the mainstream. He replied that rectifying it was now a major project at CBC.

Another asked the lawmen what was being done about the over 100 extremist groups like “Soldiers of Odin” in Canada. The “Soldiers” even have a Facebook page. The policemen replied that they were networking and exchanging information.

Trump phenomenon

Haroon Siddiqui, an Editor Emeritus of the Toronto Star, then spoke on Islamophobia.

“(U.S. President Donald) Trump is doing what he said he’d do,” said Siddiqui: “And the Trump phenomenon has already happened here. Dozens of mosques have been vandalized, and Muslims assaulted. The alleged killer in Quebec was a Trump fan. We need to stand in solidarity with one another. Muslims can’t be maligned any more than they already have been. The ‘alt-right’ is code for white supremacists; indifference and inaction imply complicity with the victimisers.”

"Though Muslims aren't interned, they feel a psychological internment."

“The only crime of Canadians refused entry to the U.S. was that they weren’t white,” continued Siddiqui.

"Trump is similar to (former Canadian prime minister) Stephen Harper. Both elicited white support from their electoral bases. Once it was rumoured that Jews were taking over the world; now it’s Muslims. People talk of women’s status in Islam, but Muslim women are being spat on and shoved by North Americans.

"Have those who say the Koran says to kill infidels ever read the Old Testament? Wars call for propaganda, but one can’t separate Muslims there from Muslims here. When we demonize one, we demonize the other.”

Shahina Siddiqui thanked the funders at the end: Canadian Heritage, Sargent Blue Jeans, and The Winnipeg Foundation.  


Ashoke Dasgupta is a Winnipeg-based journalist who has won three awards in Canada and Nepal.

This content was developed exclusively for New Canadian Media and can be re-published with appropriate attribution. For syndication rights, please write to publisher@newcanadianmedia.ca

Published in Top Stories

by Ted Alcuitas in Vancouver

The man who put Filipinos on the political map of this country has died in Winnipeg, his home for more than five decades.

Conrad Santos, the first Filipino-Canadian to be elected to a provincial legislative assembly died at Winnipeg’s Victoria General Hospital on Feb. 29. He was 81. The cause of death was not known.

In a statement, Manitoba Premier Greg Selinger offered his condolences to Santos’ family on behalf of Manitobans.

“It was with deep sadness that we learned of the passing of Dr. Santos,” Selinger said.

“Dr. Santos served his adopted province and his constituency with dedication and self-sacrifice. Our thoughts are with his family at this difficult time.”

“Dr. Santos served his adopted province and his constituency with dedication and self-sacrifice."

A distinguished career

Conrad Santos was first elected to the Manitoba Legislative Assembly under the New Democratic Party (NDP) in 1981, serving for five terms (1981-1988 and 1990-2007) before stepping down in 2007.

Born in the Philippines and a native Bulakeno, he was educated at Harvard University and the University of Michigan, where he earned a PhD in Political Science.

He moved to Winnipeg in 1965 after obtaining a teaching position at the University of Manitoba. He remained a tenured professor at the U of M until his election to the legislature. Santos also worked as a consultant for the Instituto Centro-Americano de Administracion Publica in Costa Rica, and was a board member of the Citizenship Council of Manitoba from 1977 to 1980.

The soft-spoken and eccentric Santos led a colourful and sometimes controversial political life.

Santos was active in the Winnipeg Filipino community for many years serving as an adviser to many organizations notably the Philippine Association of Manitoba (PAM). He was a member of the Knights of Rizal, the organization that first broke the story of his death.

Controversy in his political life

The soft-spoken and eccentric Santos led a colourful and sometimes controversial political life. Long before riding a bike became popular, he was already riding one to the legislature from his home in Fort Garry with his iconic Che Guevarra hat and a sling leather bag at his side.

Santos was first elected to the Manitoba legislature in the 1981 provincial election as a New Democrat in the northwest Winnipeg riding of Burrows, defeating NDP-turned-Progressive Member of the Legislative Assembly (MLA) Ben Hanuschak. He was re-elected in the 1986 election.

In June 1984, there were unconfirmed rumours that he was considering a move to the Progressive Conservative Party.

In 1987, he was accused of trying to use his political position to prevent Winnipeg School Division No. 1 from expropriating a house he owned. 



Santos lost the Burrows NDP nomination to Doug Martindale in 1988, and subsequently entered the party’s leadership election. He was not regarded as a serious candidate, and received only five votes on the first ballot. Santos ran for mayor of Winnipeg in 1989, but was again not considered a serious candidate and finished a distant fourth.



In 1990, Santos won the NDP nomination for Broadway, another northwest riding, by a single vote over favoured candidate Marianne Cerilli. He subsequently defeated Liberal incumbent Avis Gray in the 1990 general election, and was re-elected in the 1995 election.

In 1995, he endorsed Lorne Nystrom’s bid to lead the federal NDP. 

When the Broadway riding was eliminated by redistribution in 1999, Santos won the NDP nomination in Wellington (also in Winnipeg’s northwest), and was returned by a wide margin in the 1999 provincial election.

He was again re-elected in the 2003 election. 

Santos was named Deputy Speaker after the elections of 1986 and 1999, but has never been appointed to a cabinet position.

There is no doubt that Conrad Santos paved the way for the current crop of Filipino politicians in Manitoba.

Santos left the New Democratic Party caucus shortly before the 2007 provincial election after being accused of improperly selling party membership cards (he denied the charge). He campaigned as an independent, and finished last in a field of five candidates. His successor, Flor Marcelino, was a last minute replacement candidate for the NDP.

The Winnipeg Sun reported in 2013 that on Mar. 16, 2005 “Santos was scolded for bringing a paring knife into chamber. …The speaker confiscated the three-inch blade from Santos, who apologized for bringing it into the house.”

Paving the way for Filipino politicians

There is no doubt that Conrad Santos paved the way for the current crop of Filipino politicians in Manitoba including Dr. Rey Pagtakhan who followed him as the first Filipino to be elected member of Parliament in 1988.

Pagtakhan’s nephew Mike, is a long-serving member of the Winnipeg city council and there are currently two sitting members of the Manitoba legislature – Flor Marcelino and Ted Marcelino, both of the NDP.

Other Filipino politicians served in various positions in school boards putting Manitoba firmly in the leading position in the country as having the most number of Filipino politicians in office.

Santos is survived by one daughter, two sons and two daughters-in-law, Evelyn Santos, Conrad and Leslie Santos, Rob and Kim Santos, and their families; four grandchildren, Kristen and Matt, Ginny and Josie.

Affectionately known as ka Rading to his family, he is also survived by his three siblings and three sisters-in-law, Leticia Santos, Rebecca Santos, Ruel and Dina Santos, Narcisa Santos, Luz Santos, and all their families (including his nephew, Paul Santos).

Santos was predeceased by his parents, Federico and Marcelina Santos of Malolos, Bulacan, Philippines; his sister Melita Santos Beltran, his brothers Virgilio Santos and Benjamin Santos, and his wife Emerita Santos, and is survived by their families.


This article first appeared on PhilippineCanadianNews.com. Republished with permission.

Published in Politics
Wednesday, 24 February 2016 22:20

Winnipeg's Racism Problem: Immigrants Can Help

by Kayla Isomura in Vancouver

A year after being called “Canada’s most racist city,” Winnipeg is on its way to becoming more inclusive, and immigrants can be part of the solution.

“It is wonderful that very recently we are seeing more people speaking out against racism, but it hasn't gone away just yet,” said Sheila North Wilson, grand chief of Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak (MKO), an organization that represents northern First Nations in Manitoba.

A 2015 Maclean’s article, titled “Welcome to Winnipeg: Where Canada’s racism problem is at its worst,” highlighted examples of violence and racism the Indigenous community in Winnipeg has faced.

According to the article, Manitoba and Saskatchewan “report the highest levels of racism in the country, often by a wide margin.”

Nancy Macdonald, the article’s author and a former Winnipeg resident, says Winnipeg’s “racism problem” has improved.

Over the past year, conversations have sparked among politicians, Indigenous leaders and other community groups around racism in the Prairie city.

“New Canadians need to be taught as soon as they arrive about who Indigenous people are and how they've arrived to where we are now.”

“Everything that’s happened has happened not because of that article, but because of [Mayor] Brian Bowman who did something very brave,” said Macdonald. “Rather than say this article was wrong, he chose to acknowledge the problems.”

Moving towards solutions – and immigrants can play a role

Last month, Bowman declared 2016 as the Year of Reconciliation for Winnipeg, promising to work towards diversity and greater inclusion with the Indigenous community. Winnipeg has the largest Indigenous population in Canada, making up 11 per cent of the city’s population, according to the City.

Bowman has committed to developing an Urban Aboriginal Accord to recognize Indigenous peoples’ role in Canadian history and making diversity training for all civic employees mandatory.

“Over the last year, I believe we were able to reignite the public conversation and dialogue on racism and inclusion, and I believe we have been able to shift the tone,” he said in a news release.

North Wilson said the city’s efforts and ongoing dialogues are positive, but hopes they lead to long-term change.

She would like to see recommendations from the discussions be implemented into “real systemic changes” that deal with the realities of racism.

The key is education, and new immigrants can be part of the solution, she said.

“New Canadians need to be taught as soon as they arrive about who Indigenous people are and how they've arrived to where we are now,” said North Wilson. “This includes leaning about the treaties, Indian Act, residential schools, the child welfare industry and the plight of missing and murdered Indigenous [people].”

“We were taught a very bad image of First Nations people.”

She recommends immigrants visit the Treaty Relations Commission of Manitoba, Aboriginal Languages of Manitoba, and Neechi Commons as resources to learn more about Indigenous history. Another suggested resource is IRCOM (Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization of Manitoba).

Racism: a common bond

While she’s experienced the most amount of racism in Winnipeg, North Wilson said the worst type of racism she’s faced was in Brandon, the second largest city in Manitoba after Winnipeg.

Some immigrants said they also experience more extreme forms of racism in other parts of the country, and that in Winnipeg, racism towards immigrants is no different than in any other Canadian city.

“We were taught a very bad image of First Nations people,” said Amanda Luong, a first-generation Chinese Canadian who was born in Winnipeg.

“For me, I faced more stereotypes, but I didn’t feel discrimination as much as First Nations people.”

In 2012, Luong moved to Vancouver, B.C. She would argue that immigrants face worse discrimination in the west-coast city.

“Racism is worse in Vancouver towards every minority group, especially with foreign ownership and Asian cultures,” she said.

In Vancouver, Chinese immigrants have been blamed for high house prices over the past few years.

A study published by urban planner Andy Yan last year caused controversy over the demographics of who was buying houses in some of the city’s affluent neighbourhoods. He suggested the majority of the homes in his study may have been bought by people newly arrived from China.

Brian Tang, another resident of Vancouver and former resident of Winnipeg, had the same sentiment about the target of racism in different cities.

“Conversely, it is important that we learn about the history and backgrounds of the new inhabitants to our lands.”

“Here, it’s Chinese people, Asian people. In Winnipeg, it’s Aboriginal people, so it exists in both cities,” he said.

A two-way street

North Wilson said that Indigenous people in Winnipeg not only face stereotyping but discrimination in daily tasks.

“Our people have a harder time at banks, rental agencies, stores, governments, police agencies, for example. Many in these and other sectors of society seem to disregard our people at first and treat them poorly,” she said.

“You hardly see any of our Indigenous people working in these common places.”

She adds that support from immigrant communities in the city’s inclusion efforts should go two ways.

“Conversely, it is important that we learn about the history and backgrounds of the new inhabitants to our lands,” she added.

As part of the City’s efforts to reduce racism, Bowman has also promised to continue the support of private sponsorship for refugees in the event of a sponsorship breakdown, to work with other cities to address racism challenges, to visit every high school in Winnipeg to emphasize the importance of reconciliation and diversity, and to continue to welcome refugees.

The City of Winnipeg was not available for comment by deadline.

This content was developed exclusively for New Canadian Media and can be re-published with appropriate attribution. For syndication rights, please write to publisher@newcanadianmedia.ca

Published in Politics
Thursday, 05 November 2015 21:42

Canadians Still Conflicted About Newcomers

by Florence Hwang in Regina, Saskatchewan

Two independent surveys find that Canadians are positive about newcomers in theory, but they are not so agreeable when pushed out of their comfort zones.

According to Immigration Partnership Winnipeg’s recent survey, Winnipeggers generally have positive attitudes about immigrants and refugees. Fifty-nine per cent said they felt newcomers had a positive effect on the city, with only nine per cent saying newcomers had a negative effect.

Eighty-eight per cent said they feel good about the presence of newcomers. About 75 per cent said they were comfortable with immigrant neighbours, while 66 per cent were amenable to a close friend or relative marrying a newcomer.

Almost two in three Canadians (62 per cent) report they are "worried" about a rise in racism.

But only 58 per cent said they would be comfortable with a newcomer supervisor at work, and 53 per cent said they were fine with immigrant co-workers getting time for cultural events.

Respondents with higher incomes and higher levels of education seemed more positive about immigration than those who earn less than $30,000 per year or only have high school education.

Women and younger Winnipegger respondents were more positive towards newcomers than men and respondents over 55 years old.

In the Canadian Race Relations Foundation (CRRF) 2014 survey on issues of religion, racism and intergroup relations, almost two in three Canadians (62 per cent) report they are "worried" about a rise in racism, with varying percentages of concern for each group, such as Muslims, Aboriginal peoples, immigrants and Jews.

“When you look at the numbers, you see that … almost 50 per cent of us aren’t so happy about adjusting our workplace, just taking that one example,” says Anita Bromberg, CRRF’s executive director.

“Put that all together, and the answer is we’ve got work to do.”

Change needed at the institutional level

Alden Habacon, a diversity and inclusion strategist with the University of British Columbia, observes that racism is implicit, subtle and institutional.

“They took a risk on us. Are we willing to take a risk on them?"

“It is more harmful in those ways. It may not hurt your feelings, but you can’t get ahead, you can’t fulfil your purpose. It’s wasted potential. It hurts social sustainability of a multicultural society,” says Habacon.

He points to institutional change as the way to counter racism. For example, improvement could be made to the Labour Market Impact Assessment process.

“We need to come up with a way of testing people’s technical ability in a way that recognizes their language assets. We could split the cost for this process. We benefit from this process as well as them. We both have skin in the game,” he says.

He also thinks Canada needs to figure out what is legitimately needed for qualifications and that society needs to do more to offset the costs for newcomers to integrate into society in terms of education and living expenses.

“They took a risk on us. Are we willing to take a risk on them? We could offer to give microloans. We know they are good for their money. We need to bring change on a policy level,” he says.

We talk about Canada’s diversity and its multiculturalism but there’s an underlying discomfort … a fear about what opening the door is going to look like."

Fighting fears of the unknown

Bromberg feels society needs to have a more diverse structure, deal with systemic issues and change attitudes.

“We talk about Canada’s diversity and its multiculturalism but there’s an underlying discomfort … a fear about what opening the door is going to look like. Fear of the unknown, fear of the other. Fear of people you don’t know enough about,” she says.

Still, Bromberg has an optimistic view for the future generations. She says that children are able to see human beings, not people of different backgrounds, to respect, celebrate and accept individuals for their worth.

“You want a diverse economy and a diverse planting scheme. Well, it’s the same as human beings that are we ready to accept that and put the systems in place that opens all the doors,” says Bromberg, whose grandparents emigrated from the Ukraine to flee persecution.

While Habacon acknowledges there are positive attitudes towards different races, he thinks more needs to be done.  

“Often, the change comes behind the scenes to effect real culture change. Attitude is just the beginning. Positive perception leads to action, which leads to habits, and institutional policy change goes on without any effort,” he says.

He says that Winnipeg struggles with racism and disparity.

“That’s a problem. Socially, the climate isn’t good. There’s a disparity in terms of health care, Aboriginals have a harder time accessing health care, education services due to racism. There’s nothing that can equate the disadvantages that Aboriginals have experienced,” he says.

This content was developed exclusively for New Canadian Media and can be re-published with appropriate attribution. For syndication rights, please write to publisher@newcanadianmedia.ca

Published in Policy

WINNIPEG — It looks increasingly like the riding of Winnipeg South Centre – the Winnipeg riding with the largest number of Jewish...

-- Delivered by Feed43 service

The Canadian Jewish News

Read Full Article

Published in Politics

WINNIPEG — About 100 Winnipeggers went to the steps of the Manitoba legislature July 30 to add their voices to thousands of others...

-- Delivered by Feed43 service

The Canadian Jewish News

Read Full Article

Published in National

It was billed as a “Jane’s Walk” - named for the famous urban planner, Jane Jacobs, but on Sunday, May 4, over 70 individuals participated in what might have been referred to as “Zack’s Walk”.

-- Delivered by Feed43 service

The Jewish Post and News

Read Full Article

Published in History

If the newly revived Winnipeg Jewish Theatre wanted to come back with a resounding splash, it’s certainly done that with its latest production: “Bad Jews”.

-- Delivered by Feed43 service

The Jewish Post and News

Read Full Article

Published in Arts & Culture
Friday, 08 May 2015 17:30

Aquino Skips Winnipeg

by Ted Alcuitas (@Ted_Alcuitas) in Vancouver

Philippine President Benigno Aquino is bypassing Winnipeg, home to one of Canada’s fastest growing and oldest Filipino communities, as he heads to Vancouver tomorrow for the final stop in his state visit.

“I couldn’t care less,” says Monina Relano, by telephone from Winnipeg.

Relano, who was one of the pillars of the anti-Marcos movement, August Twenty One Movement (ATOM) in Winnipeg, during Aquino’s mother Corazon’s time as president, minced no words in her distaste for Filipino politicians, including Aquino.

“I’m not very impressed with PNoy – he’s just one TRAPO politician,” says the retired teacher. TRAPO, which means ‘rag’, is the derogatory description of traditional politicians used by Filipinos.

“Clearly the importance of this visit cannot be overemphasized and would have given the President a chance to see and experience the vibrant Filipino community in Winnipeg.” - Reis Pagtakhan, immigration lawyer

Yet, some members of Winnipeg’s large Filipino community say they’re disappointed their city isn’t on Aquino’s itinerary this week.

“I was disappointed to hear about it, given the growing Filipino population, not just in Winnipeg, but in Manitoba itself,” says immigration lawyer Reis Pagtakhan (pictured to the right), by phone from Winnipeg.

“Clearly the importance of this visit cannot be overemphasized and would have given the President a chance to see and experience the vibrant Filipino community in Winnipeg,” Pagtakhan explained, adding that Winnipeg and Manitoba has a lot of ‘firsts’ (referring to the many elected Filipino politicians). “[We] have a lot to offer as to how Filipinos can contribute to this society and to the home country.”

Pagtakhan also mentioned that there was even some discussion last year to having a direct flight from Winnipeg to Manila by Philippine Airlines (PAL). 

“It’s unfortunate that he’s not visiting here,” said Jon Reyes, an aspiring provincial politician and former president of the Manitoba Filipino Business Council. “A lot of Filipinos were anticipating seeing him.” 

Reyes is facing a nomination meeting tomorrow (May 9) for the Provincial Conservatives in the Maples riding where two other Filipinos – former Member of the Legislative Assembly, Cris Aglugub, and perennial candidate Jose ‘Boy’ Tomas are challenging him. 

“I guess he has too much in his plate,” said Reyes who received an invitation from the Prime Minister’s Office on May 1 to meet Aquino in Ottawa yesterday. Reyes couldn’t make it. 

Poorly Planned Visit: Critics 

The fact that Aquino is not stopping in Winnipeg comes as a surprise since Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper himself announced the foreign president’s visit at Winnipeg’s Jimel’s International Cuisine on April 23.

“Personally, I think it would’ve been a very good gesture,” Pilipino Express editor-in-chief Emmie Joaquin told the Winnipeg Free Press in an interview. 

Joaquin said she heard Harper say Aquino would be stopping in Ottawa, Toronto, Winnipeg and Vancouver.

Filipino newspaper editors in Toronto complained as early as April that they were not properly briefed as to the details of the visit.

Having worked in Filipino media for decades, Joaquin said this is the fastest she’s seen a president’s visit to Canada announced and planned.

Earlier visits by former Philippine presidents, including Corazon Aquino, were announced months in advance, with detailed itineraries spelled out, she said.

For this visit, she added, the trip appears to have been planned on short notice. On May 6 she received an invitation to a reception in Toronto with Aquino on May 8.

“I was happy to be invited, but that’s really short notice,” she said.

Some people in the community have criticized the Philippine Consulate for the lack of preparation.

Filipino newspaper editors in Toronto complained in early April that they were not properly briefed on the details of the visit.

“We do not welcome him here at all. The points we’ll raise tomorrow include his government’s grim record of human rights violations, environmental destruction, corruption and continued neglect of the rights of Filipino migrant workers.” - Jane Ordinario, Migrante-BC

In Vancouver, Philippine consulate officials were tight-lipped, and there appears to be confusion as to where the venue for the Vancouver reception will be.

The Vancouver Sun reported the Vancouver Convention Centre, while other outlets said it would be at the Pan Pacific Hotel

Our e-mail to the Vancouver Consulate was not answered by deadline.

Meanwhile, Migrante B.C. will be going ahead with its planned demonstration against President Aquino’s reception tomorrow at the Pan Pacific Hotel.

“We do not welcome him here at all,” says Jane Ordinario, Migrante-BC Coordinator. “The points we’ll raise tomorrow include his government’s grim record of human rights violations, environmental destruction, corruption and continued neglect of the rights of Filipino migrant workers.” 

She added that Harper’s role in worsening the conditions for temporary foreign workers in Canada would also be highlighted along with other issues.

“Prime Minister Harper is also sadly mistaken if he believes inviting President Aquino might boost his popularity with the Filipino community. Many are actually clamouring for President Aquino’s ouster and his latest satisfaction rating is at its lowest ever,” she concluded in the statement.

New Bilateral Initiatives Announced 

While some groups like Migrante-BC question Harper’s motives when it comes to Aquino’s visit, Canada's PM announced the new bilateral initiatives that emerged on Parliament Hill today. These initiatives, in the area of trade, investment and global security, are what both leaders stated was the primary purpose of the trip in the weeks leading up to it.

The initiatives announced today clearly demonstrate that both countries are committed to further enhancing our bilateral relationship with a particular emphasis on commerce, development and security.” - Stephen Harper

One such trade initiative announced was the launch of discussions exploring a Canada-Philippines free trade agreement, which would aim to strengthen economic ties between the two countries. Canadian businesses and exporters are expected to greatly benefit from such an agreement.                                                  

Also announced were three specific initiatives aimed at enhancing collaboration with the Philippines to counter regional and global security threats, including capacity building for port and maritime security, as well as police officers, in the Asian-Pacific country.

“Canada and the Philippines share a close friendship based on shared values and significant people-to-people ties,” said Harper. “The initiatives announced today clearly demonstrate that both countries are committed to further enhancing our bilateral relationship with a particular emphasis on commerce, development and security.”

Aquino will conclude his three-day state visit to Canada May 9 in Vancouver.

 

This content was developed exclusively for New Canadian Media and can be re-published with appropriate attribution. For syndication rights, please write to publisher@newcanadianmedia.ca

 

Published in Top Stories

By MYRON LOVE Spiritual leadership comes in many forms. But the bottom line, as enunciated by Jane Eisner, the editor of the Jewish Daily Forward, comes down to “the power of personal connection – through study, social action or simple acts of kindness”.

-- Delivered by Feed43 service

The Jewish Post and News

Read Full Article

Published in National
Page 1 of 4

Poll Question

Do you agree with the new immigration levels for 2017?

Yes - 30.8%
No - 46.2%
Don't know - 23.1%
The voting for this poll has ended on: %05 %b %2016 - %21:%Dec

Featured Quote

The honest truth is there is still reluctance around immigration policy... When we want to talk about immigration and we say we want to bring more immigrants in because it's good for the economy, we still get pushback.

-- Canada's economic development minister Navdeep Bains at a Public Policy Forum economic summit

Zo2 Framework Settings

Select one of sample color schemes

Google Font

Menu Font
Body Font
Heading Font

Body

Background Color
Text Color
Link Color
Background Image

Top Wrapper

Background Color
Modules Title
Text Color
Link Color
Background Image

Header Wrapper

Background Color
Modules Title
Text Color
Link Color
Background Image

Mainmenu Wrapper

Background Color
Modules Title
Text Color
Link Color
Background Image

Slider Wrapper

Background Color
Modules Title
Text Color
Link Color
Background Image

Scroller Wrapper

Background Color
Modules Title
Text Color
Link Color
Background Image

Mainframe Wrapper

Background Color
Modules Title
Text Color
Link Color
Background Image

Bottom Scroller Wrapper

Background Color
Modules Title
Text Color
Link Color
Background Image

Breadcrumb Wrapper

Background Color
Modules Title
Text Color
Link Color
Background Image

Bottom Menu Wrapper

Background Color
Modules Title
Text Color
Link Color
Background Image

Bottom Wrapper

Background Color
Modules Title
Text Color
Link Color
Background Image
Background Color
Modules Title
Text Color
Link Color
Background Image