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By Gerald V. Paul Mark Saunders has welcomed criticism after saying that as Toronto’s first Black police chief he needs time to comment on carding. “If I don’t get criticism,…

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The Caribbean Camera

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Sunday, 03 May 2015 10:02

NCM NewsFeed: Weekly Newsletter May 1

Our headlines this week: president of the Phillipines to visit Canada + debunking the 'ethnic vote' myth + a black chief of police for Toronto + Canada sends delegations to Armenia and Turkey + discussing race in the classroom + honouring Charlie Hebdo + 'root causes' of terrorism + much more


 

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Here and Now

This week we feature the visit of the Philippine president, delve into ethnic voting patterns, spotlight documentary films, and explain what Toronto’s first black police chief means to the city.

The Philippine president’s upcoming visit to Canada has sparked mixed reactions, writes Ted Alcuitas, as Benigno Aquino III is the Philippines’ first leader in 20 years to come to Canada, now home to around 700,000 Filipinos.

Debunking the “ethnic vote” strategy is the latest in our Election Watch series in the build-up to the federal election. Academics Stephen E. White, Inder S. Marwah and Phil Triadafilopoulos tell us how there’s no single “ethnic vote.”

Spotlighting diverse films and filmmakers at this year’s Hot Docs is Shazia Javed, herself a writer, photographer and filmmaker. All week long we’ll feature her coverage of diverse films and filmmakers at this year’s Hot Docs Canadian International Film Festival in Toronto.

Canadian filmmaker captures untold story of women car racers in Palestine: Shazia Javed’s coverage of Hot Docs continues with Speed Sisters, a film that bucks traditional portrayals of the troubled land.

A black chief of police for Toronto: Patrick Hunter, a communications consultant and columnist, looks into the appointment of Mark Saunders by the largest municipal police service in Canada, a historic first for the city but not for Canada.

NCM NewsBriefs this week features an immigrant loan project being made permanent, grants to Ontario seniors’ groups, and a Calgary school getting into trouble for alleged discrimination against Muslim students.

Ripples

With Philippine President Benigno Aquino III set to visit Canada this month, Manila has dropped its demand that Ottawa take back the trash that was illegally shipped there from Canada two years ago. Philippine Environment Secretary Ramon Paje said an inter-agency government committee agreed to send the trash to landfills “for the sake of our diplomatic relations” with Canada. The shipment was passed off as scrap materials for recycling, but customs inspectors discovered it contained household waste.

Meanwhile, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's remarks during a speech in Toronto about his plan to clean up the mess left by previous governments has led to heated exchanges in New Delhi. One of the remarks Modi made in Toronto was that he planned to turn India into a powerhouse of skilled workers, from “scam India to skill India.” Helping him towards that goal are Canadian educators partnering with the National Skill Development Corporation of India to help train Indian youth.

Canada once again found itself torn between diaspora politics last weekend — this time over a pair of First World War commemorations in Armenia and Turkey. Both countries invited Gov. Gen. David Johnston to their events, but he chose instead to attend a Gallipoli ceremony at the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa. In his place Citizenship and Immigration Minister Chris Alexander visited Armenia to commemorate the 1915 massacre of Armenians at the hands of Ottoman Turks. It’s a tragedy that Ottawa labels a genocide, to the anger of Turkey. Left to face the furor was junior foreign affairs minister Lynne Yelich (pictured), who led a Canadian delegation to Turkey to mark the start of the Gallipoli campaign.

Also, the very existence of the Armenian diaspora in Canada is posing a problem for Turkey. While views in Turkey on the Armenian issue vary, there’s a general notion that the Armenian diaspora is now strong enough to affect Turkey’s foreign relations.

By 2017, more people will be moving to Ireland than leaving, as the number of people returning home to the Emerald Isle increases, the Irish government predicts. Minister for Finance Michael Noonan said next year would mark the end of “net outward migration,” with a “return to net inward migration” by 2017. Canada has fourth largest population of Irish-born (25,985) after the U.K., U.S. and Australia.

A Canadian who fought in Israel’s war on Gaza last summer was one of 120 who received a citation for excellence for excellence from President Reuven Rivlin last week. “J.,” whose name was not revealed due to the nature of his service, is a soldier in an elite reconnaissance unit. And writing about immigration from Israel to Canada is Rabbi Dow Marmur, who tells us about Israelis coming to live in St. John, N.B.

Moving on to Africa: Zimbabweans outside of the country have had much better luck than those who stayed behind.This interview examines the disconnect, and also discusses how diaspora Zimbabweans keen on investing in their home country feel frustrated by not being able to do business.

Harmony Jazz

Ana Paris writes on what will likely be the last trial in Germany for complicity in the Holocaust and tells us how the definition of complicity has broadened to include “aiding and abetting.”

Richard Milner of the Center for Urban Education at the University of Pittsburgh calls for more open and uncomfortable discussions in the classroom on race and provides advice for how teachers can introduce the subject. And challenging Western assumptions about Islam is Carla Power, a former Newsweek journalist whostudied the Qur’an for a year with Sheikh Akram Nadwi.

Former Ontario cabinet minister John Milloy comments on the recent Supreme Court ruling against opening prayers at city council meetings, proposing to maintain Ontario’s practice of rotating prayers rather than a minute of reflection.

There has been major controversy after PEN honoured Charlie Hebdo with its Freedom of Expression Courage Award, sparking considerable commentary, with one of the best by Laura Miller in Salon.

Lastly, more on the “root causes” of terrorism: an article from visiting French Justice Minister Christiane Taubira onhow socio-economic factors contribute to radicalization — a message that Canadian policymakers need to hear. 

Back Pocket

“The foreign has long been my stomping ground, my sanctuary, as one who grew up a foreigner wherever I happened to be … there will always be some who feel threatened by — and correspondingly hostile to — anyone who looks and sounds different from themselves. But in my experience, foreignness can as often be an asset,” wrote Pico Iyer in an essay titled ‘The Foreign Spell’ for Lapham’s Quarterly.

Iyer, a travel writer, philosopher and global citizen, will be in Toronto next week for the first annual Global Diversity Exchange at Ryerson University. The event will explore big ideas on diversity, prosperity and migration.

Author of the acclaimed The Global Soul and The Art of Stillness: Adventures in Going Nowhere, Pico Iyer (pictured) has been writing about movement, uprootedness and new notions of home for more than 30 years. His books include Video Night in Kathmandu, The Lady and the Monk, and Imagining Canada. His 2008 work on the Dalai Lama, The Open Road, drawing on 34 years of talks and travels with the Tibetan leader, was a best-seller. If you are in Toronto on Thursday, May 7, a night at the lecture would be an evening well spent.


With that, have a great weekend and don’t forget to look up the next edition of NCM NewsFeed every Friday!

Publisher’s Note: This NewsFeed was compiled with input from our Newsroom Editors and regular columnist, Andrew Griffith. We welcome your feedback.

 

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Published in Top Stories

  Rejecting the Opposition charge that Modi was lowering the [...]

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The Link

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Published in India
Thursday, 30 April 2015 04:33

Baltimore Burning and Toronto Reminiscing

“Baltimore is burning. Surprised? Nah. (See Baltimore Riots of 1968),” author Dalton Higgins posted on Facebook this week.

“For those who have never actually been in a riot scene, it must be really hard to understand. Having walked down Toronto’s Yonge Street in 1992 as a young man; of shootings of Black men by Toronto Police,” Higgins wrote.

The Associated Press reported that “rioters plunged part of Baltimore into chaos Monday, torching a pharmacy, setting police cars ablaze and throwing bricks at police hours after thousands mourned the man (Freddie Gray) who died from a severe injury he suffered in police custody.”

The Caribbean Camera

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Published in National
Monday, 27 April 2015 18:00

Modi in Toronto

Toronto: Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi was given a warm welcome during the Toronto leg of his cross-Canada tour, where upon his arrival he was welcomed by hundreds of enthusiastic supporters waving Canadian and Indian flags on the tarmac of Pearson International Airport.  Prime Minister Modi was joined by Prime Minister Stephen Harper, Minister Jason […]

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The Weekly Voice

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Published in National
Friday, 24 April 2015 19:01

Chief Saunders: ‘Bear With Me’

By Gerald V. Paul Toronto’s Police Chief-designate Mark Saunders is a potential agent of change – but he’s the first to tell you, he’s no miracle worker. However, the 32-year…

The Caribbean Camera

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Published in Caribbean

by Janice Dickson (@janicedickson) in Ottawa

India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi spent time in Ottawa, Toronto and Vancouver this week — which led to a ton of photo-ops with Prime Minister Stephen Harper and some with Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau.

But Opposition Leader Tom Mulcair was mum on Modi. He is the only major federal political figure who hasn’t publicly acknowledged Modi’s visit — and unlike Harper and Trudeau, he didn’t have his picture taken with the Indian PM as a pre-campaign gesture to the large and politically active Indo-Canadian community.

Despite the rapturous reception Modi received in many quarters during his visit, he remains a controversial figure in Indian politics. Before he was elected prime minister in 2014, Modi was chief minister of Gujarat, a state in India with a population of more than 60 million. In 2002, Gujarat was ripped apart by religious riots in which nearly 1,000 people – mostly Muslims – died.

Despite multiple requests, iPolitics did not receive Mulcair’s official position on Prime Minister Modi.

The Supreme Court of India later absolved Modi of any blame for the riots, but lingering allegations about his actions at the time have undermined his relationship with many countries. In fact, Modi was denied a visa to Canada during a 12-year period when he was suspected of these human rights abuses.

Mulcair spokesman George Smith told iPolitics the NDP leader didn’t meet with Modi due to a scheduling conflict. Asked for a comment on Modi’s visit, NDP critic for multiculturalism, Andrew Cash, gave iPolitics the following statement — which doesn’t mention Modi by name, or reference his visit:

“Canada has important trade, economic and cultural ties with India, and this is a chance to celebrate and strengthen these links. India is the world’s largest democracy; ensuring that Canada has a strong relationship with it will be critical in the years to come. An NDP government would continue to strengthen Canada’s relationship with our allies, like India.”

Anita Singh, research fellow at the Centre for Foreign Policy Studies at Dalhousie University, said she can understand why Mulcair may want to keep his distance from Modi.

“I can see why Mulcair hasn’t changed his position on Modi or why he’s not interested in being flexible on his division with Modi. His party is one that speaks to an idea of human rights and humanitarianism,” said Singh. “To flip-flop would cause him more damage.”

Despite multiple requests, iPolitics did not receive Mulcair’s official position on Prime Minister Modi.

Singh said that Mulcair’s predecessor, Jack Layton, “stood very strongly against Modi and other human rights issues that happened in India … and the aftermath of the Air India bombing – and those are all things that play into NDP rhetoric.”

But supporting Modi is not a complicated matter for either Harper or Trudeau.

Harper has been pushing out tons of photos of himself and Modi together; the Conservatives even used one photo to anchor a fundraising pitch on conservative.ca:

Harper and his ministers have tweeted their way through Modi’s visit. And Modi has reciprocated; he even changed the header image on his Facebook page to one of himself with Harper.

 

Trudeau also was eager to meet with Modi. In fact, he rescheduled a planned event in Nova Scotia in order to meet him in Toronto.

Singh said she wouldn’t attribute Harper and Trudeau’s eagerness to have their photos taken with Modi to the quest for votes in Indo-Canadian communities. The math wouldn’t make sense, the NDP hold the two ridings with the highest number of Indo-Canadians — Surrey-Newton has over 52,000 East Indian residents and Brampton East has nearly 48,000 East Indian residents.

“I think the electoral argument is an easy one to make and because it’s intuitive people fall back on it a lot,” Singh said. “It’s to say that ethnic communities are only voting on the basis of foreign policy – you have to make the assumption that there are no outstanding issues. There’s no evidence to show that people vote on the basis of whether Harper is nice to Modi, or not, or whether Mulcair supports Modi.”


Re-published in partnership with iPolitics.ca

Published in Politics

Toronto (IANS): Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Thursday visited the memorial here for the victims of Air India Flight 182 that was bombed in 1985. Prime Minister Stephen Harper and his wife, Laureen accompanied Modi to pay their respects to the Air India and Narita Airport victims. They participated in the wreath-laying ceremony. Air India Flight […]

Indo-Canadian Voice

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Published in National

ON Thursday, Prime Minister Stephen Harper will participate in a business roundtable with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi at Four Seasons Hotel in Toronto earlier in the morning. Modi will later visit the Air India Memorial in Etobicoke.    

VANCOUVER VISIT  

At 2:25 p.m. Harper will greet Modi in Vancouver at Richmond’s Marriott […]

Indo-Canadian Voice

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Published in National

INDIAN Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who arrived in Ottawa on Tuesday and was received by Defence Minister Jason Kenney and other prominent Conservative MPs, will receive a welcome ceremony with military honours at 9:40 a.m. Prime Minister Stephen Harper will participate in the event. At 10 a.m. Harper will participate in a tete-a-tete meeting with […]

Indo-Canadian Voice

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Published in India

Poll Question

Do you agree with the new immigration levels for 2017?

Yes - 30.8%
No - 46.2%
Don't know - 23.1%
The voting for this poll has ended on: %05 %b %2016 - %21:%Dec

Featured Quote

The honest truth is there is still reluctance around immigration policy... When we want to talk about immigration and we say we want to bring more immigrants in because it's good for the economy, we still get pushback.

-- Canada's economic development minister Navdeep Bains at a Public Policy Forum economic summit

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