New Canadian Media
Thursday, 01 October 2015 10:57

Foreign Policy Debate Ignores Diaspora Nation

by Ranjit Bhaskar in Toronto

Rightly or wrongly, foreign policy is not high on the list of issues that Canadians would like to know about during a federal election campaign. 

That said, this week’s Munk Debate, while holding a mirror to Canada’s role in the world, tended to reflect Canadian values and how we choose to see ourselves on the global stage.

While Canadian voters’ perceived lack of interest in foreign affairs can be questioned, there need be no such ambivalence when it comes to immigrant voters. With ties to countries of birth or origin still strong, they are likely keen to know policy directions the next government in Ottawa plans to take in their spheres of interest.

Currently, one in five – or 6.8 million – Canadians are foreign-born. This is the highest share of any G7 country and the Harper government has encouraged social, cultural and economic ties between new Canadians and their birth countries as part of its trade agenda.

The government has said that if re-elected, it will establish a new “Maple Leaf” designation to recognize new Canadians who work to build cultural, economic and social links between Canada and their birth country. The Minister of Foreign Affairs would be among those making the decision to award five to seven designations per year.

Scant mention of China and India

This enthusiasm for trade with countries that have big diaspora populations in Canada did not come through during the debate.

China and India, two of the world’s largest economies that also happen to be two of the largest immigrant source countries, were hardly mentioned during the bilingual debate.

To be precise, Liberal leader Justin Trudeau mentioned both once.

[W]hile China may soon pass the U.S. as the world’s largest economy, Canada might have already missed its opportunity for greater trade with the Asian giant.

Trudeau said the Harper government did not seem to understand how important it is to be engaged in global trade particularly with the growing economies of Asia.

“That’s why we applauded the Canada-Europe agreement. But Mr. Harper is yet to deliver on [many other agreements],” Trudeau said. “He is nowhere with China, even though Australia has just signed [an agreement with China]. We made a beginning with India after the rapprochement Mr. Harper tried to do recently with the Prime Minister (Narendra Modi).”

Despite being called a “diaspora nation” because of the diverse nature of immigration to Canada, it seems the country is still not ready to diversify trade and cut its umbilical cord to the United States.

Our share of Asia’s trade has fallen by half over the past decade. And while China may soon pass the U.S. as the world’s largest economy, Canada might have already missed its opportunity for greater trade with the Asian giant.

Missed opportunity

The voters too have missed an opportunity to know from the party leaders their foreign trade policy.

As Daniel Muzyka, CEO, and Glen Hodgson, senior vice-president and chief economist, of the Conference Board of Canada, said in a recent article, if Canadians and Canadian firms are to succeed in the global marketplace, there are several questions they should ask.

Questions include what the leaders would do to build and mobilize interest in our global opportunities, what practical alternative would they support if they did not favour free trade, and what they would do differently to capture a fair share of trade with China.

[T]he repeated reference to our glorious UN peacekeeping past would have come as a surprise for many new Canadians whose countries of birth now carry much of that burden.

While the reluctance to diversify our trade due to the advantage of having the world’s largest economy south of our border was obvious during the debate, there was another theme that wasn’t.

Call it a collective denial or a national consensus to perpetuate a myth, the repeated reference to our glorious UN peacekeeping past would have come as a surprise for many new Canadians whose countries of birth now carry much of that burden.

Bangladesh, Ethiopia, India, Pakistan, Rwanda, Nepal, Senegal, Ghana, China and Nigeria are currently the top 10 contributors. Canada ranks 62 out of 126 countries with 88 personnel.

Cold War soldiers

It is true that Canada was often the single biggest contributor to peacekeeping missions between 1956 and 1992, sending about 80,000 soldiers by the time the Blue Berets won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1988.

But, after these relatively benign observer missions, and two taxing tour of duties in Somalia and the Balkans in the 1990s, Canada seemed to lose its appetite for peacekeeping.

By design or not, the issue of Israel and Palestine was ignored amid the predictable sound and fury on the havoc caused by the Islamic State.

It is also important to understand that what motivated Canada all those years ago was the Cold War. It was to primarily defend western interests and our own strategic ones. Far from being peacekeepers, we were dedicated Cold War soldiers fighting the Soviets.

Fast-forward to the Munk Debate and it seemed the Cold War still looms over us.

Trudeau was asked how he would handle Russia’s Vladimir Putin. It elicited a nervous titter from the audience and a banal answer.

This obviously was not about foreign policy, but about paying lip service to the large Ukrainian diaspora in the same way as Trudeau said Harper had turned Canada’s support for Israel into a “domestic political football.”

By design or not, the issue of Israel and Palestine was ignored amid the predictable sound and fury on the havoc caused by the Islamic State. Several other topics of deep interest to Canadian voters, new and old, were overlooked.

But as the pundits have unanimously ruled that this debate was the best so far, so be it. The freeze is still on and we like to keep our myths alive.

This content was developed exclusively for New Canadian Media and can be re-published with appropriate attribution. For syndication rights, please write to publisher@newcanadianmedia.ca

Published in Politics
Tuesday, 08 September 2015 22:06

Family Senior Care Declining Across Asia

Asians increasingly think retirement should be funded by the individual, a departure from the traditional view that the elderly should be cared for by the family, according to newly released survey data released.

"Despite the current high-level of dependence [on family members], people don't want it this way," said Richard Jackson, founder of the Global Aging Institute.

It conducted the From Challenge to Opportunity: Wave 2 of the East Asia Retirement Survey. The institute surveyed people aged 20 or more who were the main earners.

Just six to 13 per cent of respondents in China, Hong Kong, South Korea, Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Taiwan, Singapore and the Philippines said grown children or other family members should provide financial support for the retired.

The majority of respondents said either governments and individuals should be responsible for providing income to retired people.

"I know China has a law saying children have to look after their parents, but good luck enforcing it."

The Philippines and Thailand saw 66 per cent of respondents say the government should be responsible for providing retirement income, the highest rates among those surveyed.

Places with a rapidly ageing population and pension schemes whose payouts are decreasing because of this burden like South Korea saw just 23 per cent of respondents say the government should be responsible.

Sixty-one per cent of South Korean respondents said individuals should be responsible for their own retirement.

Reflective of 'selfish Western values'

Jackson attributed the change to the rise of "selfish Western values" as Asia's economies grow, and the decline in the size of families.

He also warned current retirement systems in Asia were not robust enough and risked leaving significant proportions of the elderly population destitute and a burden on social services.

While it is difficult to predict numbers, he said: "Fifty-five per cent of Indonesians [surveyed] aren't going to get [a pension], 80-90 per cent expect to live with their grown children, and when retired expect to have income from a business or job." 

"I know China has a law saying children have to look after their parents, but good luck enforcing it," said Jackson.

[O]ne person "may need to provide for 14 people."

In China's case, successive generations of one-child families could leave many couples relying on a single offspring, another expert said.

That one person "may need to provide for 14 people," said Alfred Cheung, director of the Asia-Pacific Institute of Ageing Studies at Hong Kong's Lingnan University.

Follow in Australia's footsteps

But as people realize that neither family nor the state can be relied on in old age, "individuals are becoming more concerned and caring about their own retirement - especially now we live into such long years," Cheung said.

The Global Aging Institute's Jackson recommended governments enact fund-based pension schemes and raise the amount of mandatory contributions, and for the poor that may not be able to save as much have a government matching scheme.

"Two for every one you put in," said Jackson. 

Australia's pension system and social safety net was an example of a robust model, he said. 

He also advised governments to raise the retirement age and for both the public and private sector to support financial products that do not give lump sum payments, but monthly retirement income streams.

"It's to protect people against the consequences of bad choices," said Jackson.

The report was funded by financial services company Prudential. Some 750 to a 1000 people were surveyed in each country in a random sampling.


Published in partnership with Asian Pacific Post.

Published in China

by Will Tao (@TheWillTruth) in Vancouver, British Columbia

In her August 27, 2015 Toronto Sun article titled “Immigration marriage scammers rightfully thrown out of Canada” columnist Michele Mandel expresses her overarching view that foreign spouses involved in marriage fraud are criminals and should be immediately deported.

Using the recent Federal Court’s decision in Li v. Canada (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration) 2015 FC 998 as her smoking gun, Mandel wades through select sections of the Federal Court decision attempting to show the court’s (and by extension, Canada’s) disgust towards immigrants like Li.

Generally speaking, I too, share Mandel, Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) and Canada Border Services Agency’s (CBSA) concern about marriage fraud.

For individuals who legitimately fall in love with foreign nationals and wish to start a family in Canada, rampant cases of fraud truly serve to ‘ruin it for the rest of us.’

[I]f Canadians truly want to cut down on fraudulent marriages – there are several ways to do it that do not involve publicly ostracizing all foreign national spouses.

At the same time, however, I have some serious concerns over the public reporting and research that is done with respect to marriage fraud cases.

I believe that if Canadians truly want to cut down on fraudulent marriages – there are several ways to do it that do not involve publicly ostracizing all foreign national spouses, that instead get to the systemic roots of the problem.

Going overboard on foreign nationals

It is clear that Mandel is a very persuasive writer and, by virtue of the Sun’s previous reporting on this subject, presumably has a strong understanding of the events that led to the Federal Court decision.

On that note, I would argue that Mandel should have explained that the Federal Court did not rehear the case and only reviewed whether the decision of the Immigration Appeal Division (IAD) was reasonable and procedurally fair.

The Federal Court did not say “zaijian” or “refuse to block the deportation,” as stated in the article. The Federal Court does not have that authority.

In fact, Justice Gleeson’s decision, in line with her own judicial philosophy, focused on reviewing the IAD’s process of decision-making. In no way did the Federal Court lay any additional criticism at Li for her role in the fraud.

Mandel’s statements do not serve any argumentative purpose other than to speculate and rile up public distrust of immigrant spouses.

Second, I would argue that the most troubling part of Mandel’s article is her closing remarks, where she writes, “She’s headed home, but how many more are still out there?” She follows that up with an example of a “bogus groom” deported last year who told the IAD that “marriages like this” are so common in the Chinese community “no one is even surprised” by those who participate in them.

Mandel’s statements do not serve any argumentative purpose other than to speculate and rile up public distrust of immigrant spouses; however, they are not surprising.

In an internal CBSA report on marriage fraud, it was reported that the problem was “most prevalent in India” and it was estimated, without any evidence, that as much as 36 per cent of the spousal caseloads involving that country were potentially fraudulent.

Similar statistics have been used in other internal government reports that have attempted to paint birth tourism and live-in caregiver fraud as epidemic crises without adequate evidence backing up these allegations.

Finally, with all due respect, the supposed IAD quote about marriage fraud, which does not show up reported in any written IAD decision, is not useful given neither the case, nor context of its use was provided.

I would argue against the value of using select oral testimony from IAD hearings to purportedly represent the overall views of an entire Chinese Canadian community.

Canadians just as responsible

What Mandel fails to mention is the fate of those who put together the marriage fraud scheme – the Canadians involved. We know for a fact that a Canadian citizen who ultimately gained the financial benefit from the arranged marriage was Li’s bogus sponsor.

Furthermore, we know from the Toronto Sun's past articles that there were several individuals involved in “Project Honeymoon”. If my reading of the situation is correct, most, if not all, of them were Canadian citizens and as such avoided loss of status or deportation and served only short sentences.

Foreign national victims of immigration fraud currently have few safe, independent venues to report their situations anonymously and seek appropriate advice.

In my opinion, the immigration system itself is currently too light on marriage fraud arranged by Canadians. The light penalties under immigration legislation pale in comparison to the seriousness of fraud charges under the Criminal Code of Canada.

At the same time, many of the scheme’s masterminds are able to hide themselves behind the foreign national’s own signature endorsing the information contained in the application. Foreign national victims of immigration fraud currently have few safe, independent venues to report their situations anonymously and seek appropriate advice.

I have also heard from several individuals who truly did not know what was in their own immigration application due to language and communication barriers. Many sought counsel in the first place only because CIC’s own resources were unclear or unavailable.

They often contact ghost consultants or agents that are either posted abroad or operate in Canada with little to no regulation by Canadian immigration authorities or professional regulatory bodies.

Many of the resources they provide to clients are only in third languages. CIC and the regulators are ill equipped to monitor the quality or competency of these service providers.

Finally, to make matters worse, in countries like China it is illegal for Canadian consultants and lawyers to provide Canadian immigration advice without a Chinese immigration licence.

From what I have heard and seen, utilizing domestic Chinese agents is the only way of doing business in China, creating the kickbacks and referral fees that lend themselves to the birth of marriage fraud schemes. These schemes are often so sophisticated that they can be unbeknownst to the Canadian consultant or lawyer signing the application.

Before we ask ourselves ‘how many more fraudulent spouses we need to deport,’ let us first ask ‘how many fraudulent companies we need to report’ here at home and abroad.

We should also ask our foreign partners, especially foreign governments, how much more rapport we should be building abroad to develop new cooperative ways to regulate the illegal practice of immigration.

It is only in this way, not through aggressive media stories lambasting immigrants, that we can tackle the issue of marriage fraud.


Will Tao is a Canadian immigration lawyer and freelance journalist based out of Vancouver, B.C. He is the co-founder and lead-author of the Canadian immigration blog, Vancouverimmigrationblog.com.

This content was developed exclusively for New Canadian Media and can be re-published with appropriate attribution. For syndication rights, please write to publisher@newcanadianmedia.ca

Published in Commentary

By John Baimba Sesay.
Sierra Leone's top diplomat to the People's Republic of China has informed senior Chinese government officials that prior to the Ebola outbreak in the small West African State, Sierra Leone was enjoying a thriving economic growth under the leadership of President Koroma.
Her Excellency Madam Alice Kumba Momoh (first from right in photo), Charge D' Affaires at the Sierra Leone Embassy in Beijing spoke on Friday 14th August during a meeting with Cao (...)

- World News

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Published in China
Friday, 14 August 2015 19:08

S.U.C.C.E.S.S. Goes to China

by Deanna Cheng (@writerly_dee) in Vancouver, British Columbia

Vancouver-based immigrant-settlement organization S.U.C.C.E.S.S. will be opening a new centre in Beijing, China, to help newcomers with the transition to Canada. This makes it the first non-profit to have an overseas pre-arrival centre in a major immigrant source country. 

According to a news release, the Active Engagement and Integration Project (AEIP) service centre will provide pre-arrival services such as information on Canadian history, culture, healthcare, transportation, employment, foreign credential recognition and the education system.

The organization has had pre-landing services at overseas offices in South Korea and Taiwan since 2008. This centre will be its first in China and is funded by Citizenship and Immigration Canada for the next two years.

Four stages of support

Johnny Cheng, director of AEIP, said services are provided in four components and the end goal for each section is to plan and prepare people for integration.

“For the immigrants from South Korea and Taiwan, they couldn’t tell what Canada is like. To them, there was no difference between B.C. and Ontario.” - Johnny Cheng, director of AEIP

The first part is an assessment of the challenges each newcomer would face, which allows an action plan to be developed. 

“Every immigrant has their own reason for coming to Canada,” Cheng said. “Some may not need a lot of support. Some need information on education because they want to bring their kids to Canada. Others want another career.”

The second part is providing accurate information about a settlement location, its culture and laws.

The director said most people in other countries only understand it’s a free country and it’s why they do as they wish when they arrive.

“For the immigrants from South Korea and Taiwan, they couldn’t tell what Canada is like. To them, there was no difference between B.C. and Ontario.”

The third section is an appointment to go over academic and professional credentials.

Professionals can prepare their paperwork – including translation if necessary – ahead of time and submit them to corresponding trade associations. The organization helps clients put together a resume and provides training on how to do interviews.

Cheng said they also have a program to connect immigrants with potential employers to understand business expectations and facilitate online interviews.

“Many prospective employers don’t give international work experience the same weight as local work experience.” - Vancouver Immigration Partnership

A Vancouver Immigration Partnership document titled "Immigration Matters in Vancouver" said immigrants with specialized professional skills and high educational credentials often have trouble landing jobs in the city.

It said it could be due to lack of information about business practices or credential recognition in Canada.

“Being an immigrant can also mean they lack local Canadian work experience,” the document said. “Many prospective employers don’t give international work experience the same weight as local work experience.”

The work relationship goes both ways as it also said many regulatory organizations struggle to evaluate foreign credentials and work experience.

The final component aims to connect immigrants to community resources. “We link them to the school board, community centres, city government and libraries,” said Cheng. “We also connect with cities to arrange tours for new immigrants to learn more about the city.”

Cheng said a survey on the organization’s services in South Korea and Taiwan showed more than 90 per cent of the immigrants were able to successfully settle down in their selected Canadian neighbourhood within one month of arrival. “They were able to participate in the community and enrol their kids immediately.”

Increasing pre-arrival settlement beneficial for Canada

Over the 40 years the organization has been helping immigrants, Cheng said many people have arrived saying they wanted to find a job and didn’t know they needed specific accreditation, certificates or to obtain a certain level of language proficiency.

“It’s best to do it all before coming to Canada. If they understand the language requirement, some can practise for several months – maybe even a year – before arriving.” - Johnny Cheng, director of AEIP

“It’s best to do it all before coming to Canada,” he said. “If they understand the language requirement, some can practise for several months – maybe even a year – before arriving.”

This will help them find work faster and become a taxpayer sooner, the director explained, which is a benefit to Canada.

Beijing was selected for a pre-landing centre because it’s the capital city with easy access from neighbouring provinces.

Based on B.C. Stats immigrant landings data obtained by journalist Ian Young, the number one immigrant source country from 2005 to 2013 was China, consistently followed by India (second) and the Philippines (third) during those eight years.

Citizenship and Immigration Canada said out of 258,953 permanent residents in 2013, about 34,000 of them were from China. Again, the data shows the same ranking order between China, India and the Philippines.

Cheng said it’s not easy to have an office in China, especially for a non-profit organization. When applying, the organization had to be clear its objective was to help Chinese people plan for immigration – ones who were already approved – and not recruit people to move to Canada.

Despite this, another AEIP centre is scheduled to open in Shanghai later this year.

After expanding in China, Cheng said the organization would look to expand pre-landing services in Japan, India, Indonesia, Singapore, Malaysia, Vietnam and Australia.

The grand opening of the Beijing centre is scheduled for September 2.

Published in Top Stories

By Jarrah Kawusu-Konte, Freetown.
Since the establishment of diplomatic relations between China and Sierra Leone in 1971, bilateral political relations have been increasingly deepened on the basis of respecting and taking care of each other's core interests and major concerns.
Today, (Saturday August 8, 2015), the Foreign Minister of the People's Republic of China Wang Yi paid a courtesy call on His Excellency, President Dr Ernest Bai Koroma at State House in Freetown. The (...)

- World News

The Patriotic Vangaurd

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Published in Africa

by Samantha Lui (@SamanthaLui_) in Toronto, Ontario

Winning Miss World Canada in May was a dream come true for actress Anastasia Lin.

Having won second runner-up in 2013, the 25-year-old was ecstatic about her victory as it meant she would be going back to the country she was born in to compete.

She couldn’t wait to call her father back in China to tell him the big news. “He was so happy,” she tells New Canadian Media. “He was just jumping up. He was super proud.”

But a few days after her win, he grew too fearful to speak to her.

With news of his daughter’s pageant win spreading across China, Lin says security forces visited her father and told him that their communication was under scrutiny due to her human rights advocacy work.

I actually had emotional breakdown at the beginning quite a few times a day,” she recalls.

“When I try to call him, he doesn’t pick up. [I] felt very vulnerable. There’s nothing I can really do and I don’t know how I can improve the situation. I don’t get to know from him directly.”

Freedom of expression hindered

Born and raised in the Hunan province of China, Lin moved to Vancouver when she was 13, and she relocated to Toronto to attend university. In June, she graduated with a degree in theatre production from the University of Toronto.

Lin, who has been outspoken about freedom of expression and religious beliefs, has appeared in films with human rights themes in China such as The Bleeding Edge, where she plays an imprisoned Falun Gong practitioner. In 2011, she was also one of 10 youth leaders selected to provide input about the establishment of Canada’s Office of Religious Freedom.

Lin has also been vocal for the need for more attention on the persecution of religious communities in China, including Falun Gong practitioners, Tibetans, Uighurs and underground Christians and Catholics. The Communist Party, which remains an atheist organization, currently only formally recognizes five religions in China: Buddhism, Taoism, Islam, Protestantism and Catholicism related to the Chinese Patriotic Catholic Association.

“Right now, I’m outside of China. I’m in Canada and my freedom of expression has been hindered because they threatened my dad to put pressure on me.”

Lin’s story has already gained international attention, which includes a blog post she wrote about her experience for The Washington Post.

In July, she also spoke in Washington, DC at the Congressional Executive Commission on China, defending persecuted practitioners of Falun Gong and her concerns for her father’s safety.

“Right now, I’m outside of China. I’m in Canada and my freedom of expression has been hindered because they threatened my dad to put pressure on me,” she says, noting that she now mostly communicates with her father through her mother (who lives in Vancouver).

This is how it feels: your family’s being held hostage. The security force wants me to know that they are the ones who are in control.”

Not backing down

But despite the warnings, Lin has no plans to stop speaking out.

Growing up, Lin was always encouraged by her mother, who was a university teacher in China, to express herself.

Lin, who admits she originally thought beauty pageants were a bit “superficial”, changed her mind about entering when she met former Miss World Canada Nazanin Afshin-Jam at a human rights assembly.

Lin has already received support from the federal government and people from China, and she remains optimistic about her chances of obtaining a visa to compete in Sanya, China in December.

Lin was further inspired to enter the competition after meeting an elderly lady from China who was volunteering on the set of one of her films.

Having noticed deep purple bruises on her legs, Lin learned that the woman was being abused at a labour camp in China. The two communicated and bonded on set. Some time later, Lin was shocked to learn the news of her death.

“She had been injected from some substance in the labour camp. It never really got cured. It was really hard,” Lin says. “I was like, ‘This has to stop.’”

“I’m not thinking of making trouble or giving a hard time to anybody or any government. I just want to give those people who don’t have a voice, a voice.”

Lin has already received support from the federal government and people from China, and she remains optimistic about her chances of obtaining a visa to compete in Sanya, China in December. 

When I say I want to go to China, I don’t want to embarrass anybody … I just want to go back to participate in this pageant,” she says, noting that she just wants to be able to express how she feels.

The Canadian judges chose me to be their representative for a reason, and I think this is the best way to uphold Canadian values.”  

While the idea of taking the title of Miss World 2015 is still far away, Lin adds that her goal will remain the same if she ends up winning. She hopes she can help encourage Chinese citizens to be able to speak up for themselves.

I’m not thinking of making trouble or giving a hard time to anybody or any government. I just want to give those people who don’t have a voice, a voice.”

This content was developed exclusively for New Canadian Media and can be re-published with appropriate attribution. For syndication rights, please write to publisher@newcanadianmedia.ca

Published in Arts & Culture

United Nations (IANS): There will be more Indians than Chinese by 2022 when both Asian giants will have 1.4 billion people each and India’s population will grow at a faster pace, according to the UN.

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Published in India

More than 103,000 people in China and around the world have filed criminal complaints against former Chinese leader Jiang Zemin for his lead role in...

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Epoch Times

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Published in China

News East West

NEW YORK: A Chinese company in Beijing making fake iPhones has been busted and nine persons arrested.

The Chinese news agency Xinhua said more than 40,000 fake iPhones worth

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Published in China

Poll Question

Do you agree with the new immigration levels for 2017?

Yes - 30.8%
No - 46.2%
Don't know - 23.1%
The voting for this poll has ended on: %05 %b %2016 - %21:%Dec

Featured Quote

The honest truth is there is still reluctance around immigration policy... When we want to talk about immigration and we say we want to bring more immigrants in because it's good for the economy, we still get pushback.

-- Canada's economic development minister Navdeep Bains at a Public Policy Forum economic summit

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